Miley Cyrus Says She's 'Gone Through a Lot of Trauma' But Doesn't 'Spend Too Much Time Crying Over It'

Miley Cyrus' tool for coping with hurt and hard times is "moving on."

Chatting on Scandanavian talk show Skavlan, Cyrus, 27, spoke about how she's dealt with the recent loss and trauma in her life: the burning of her Malibu home in 2018, her divorce from Liam Hemsworth last year and the death of her grandmother in August.

"I think my feelings change really drastically all the time," she said on the show. "Because every experience we have at every second changes the way that you perceive your life."

Fred Skavlan, the show's host then asked, "Would you say that you are becoming more emotional or less emotional as you grow older?"

Cyrus explained that the answer depended on who you speak too.

"If you ask dudes I've broken up with they'll say less, but I think more," she said. "I would say that there's a stigma of coldness for a woman who actually, really moves on."

"I've gone through a lot of trauma and loss in the last couple years: I had a house fire in Malibu where I lost my house and went through a divorce recently, my grandma super close with, I lost," she added.

"In a way, I didn't spend too much time crying over it and it wasn't because I was cold or trying to avoid feeling something but it was just because I wasn't going to change it. I tried to just continue to be active in what I can control, otherwise you just start feeling like you're trapped."

Cyrus added that her "tool" for coping doesn't typically involve crying. Instead, she likes "moving forward."

"I heal through movement," she said. "I heal through traveling and meeting new people. As you lose one person, another person comes into your life."

The "Midnight Sky" star also said that she thinks the COVID-19 pandemic is not "the great equalizer" as Madonna described it.

"I don’t agree with that,” she said. “I think that we’ve seen more divide recently than I have in my lifetime, just because we are really understanding the division between race and wealth, and that wealth and health can actually be the same thing."

"And I think that’s unfathomably wrong and that is why our election is so important. So no, I don’t believe COVID has been an equalizer in any way," she added.

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