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Bachelorette Rachel Lindsay Reveals She Was Intimate with '2 Out of the 3' Suitors During Her Fantasy Suite Dates

Rachel Lindsay‘s season of The Bachelorette might be in the books, but that doesn’t mean she’s revealed all of her secrets from her time on the show!

Speaking with Scott Evans on Access’ new digital short series Golf Cart Confessions, debuting Tuesday, the 34-year-old lawyer dishes on details from her 2017 Fantasy Suite dates, which she enjoyed with former contestants Peter Kraus, Eric Bigger and (her fiancé) Bryan Abasolo.

“You know what I can confess?” Lindsay tells Evans in the PEOPLE exclusive clip, adding that she is constantly being asked if she was “intimate with everybody in the Fantasy Suites.”

When Evans — who drives Lindsay around the back lot of Universal Studios on a golf cart — asks her if she had been intimate with her final three suitors, Lindsay replies, “No!”

“Two out of the three,” she clarifies, adding, “I have never said that before!”

“I’m not going to tell you which two,” she says.

“Bryan knows this,” she tells the World of Dance host about her husband-to-be. “I was very honest with Bryan.”

“We weren’t together technically yet, right?” she adds, joking that “it didn’t count until you put a ring on it.”

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Later this month, Lindsay and Abasolo will tie the knot in a destination wedding.

But although their love story played out on the ABC reality series, the nuptials won’t be televised — even though Lindsay initially thought she’d want to share the wedding on TV.

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“So when you come off the show and you’re in that TV mode — I wanted a TV wedding. I 100 percent did,” she told PEOPLE in a recent interview. “Then, as we got to know each other in the real world and things became normalized, and then I started hearing horror stories about these TV weddings, I am very thankful that we don’t have one and that we’re doing it on our own.”

“I also think that it shows to the world or Bachelor Nation that what we have is more real,” she continued, adding, “We don’t need TV. We don’t need to get paid. We don’t buy a network, we’re doing this because this is what we want to do. I think it has more meaning.”

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