Corrie's Shelley King 'used memory of her dead mum' for Yasmeen scenes

Coronation Street’s Shelley King has revealed that she drew on the tragedy of her mother’s death in order to get the emotions needed to play Yasmeen Nazir’s shocking abuse scenes. 

The actress has been widely praised for the slow-burning and often horrific plot that saw Yasmeen slowly be controlled by the evil Geoff Metcalfe (Ian Bartholomew). 

After finally snapping and stabbing him in the neck with a broken bottle, poor Yasmeen’s torment is only set to get worse as she faces trial for his attempted murder. 

Beaten down and broken, Shelley had to draw on real-life experiences in order to get to the emotional place needed to portray the scenes accurately. 

She told The Sun on Sunday: ‘I’m a theatre actor — and all actors, in order to give an acceptable, truthful and vulnerable performance, have to open themselves up to the situation of the person they are portraying.

‘You have to rehearse and make connections that are often painful.’ 

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‘I was remembering my mother’s sudden stroke. She died in my dad’s arms,’ she explained.

‘She was a huge Corrie fan. It’s such a shame she never got to see me on the Street.’ 

Shelley’s mother Eunice passed away in 1999 – 15 years before Shelley made history on the soap as part of the first muslim family to ever grace the cobbles. 

Now, she’s changing lives thanks to the hard-hitting, and sometimes difficult to watch, scenes, with Yasmeen at breaking point after years of abuse at the hands of husband, Geoff. 

But Shelley feels that while it was tiring and took its toll on her, it was all worth it, especially because of the number of women now coming forward to seek help for their own abuse. 

‘Corrie is informing people there is help out there. It’s such an important issue to tackle — that’s why I love it,’ the actress added. 

‘A lot of the messages I’ve been getting are from people saying, “That’s happening to me’”. They’re watching the storyline and are now seeking help.’ 

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