‘SNL’: Rami Malek Killed by Pete Davidson in ‘Squid Game’ Parody

Meanwhile, in his opening monologue, the ‘No Time to Die’ actor talks about his ‘resting villain face’ and expresses his love for villains, saying, ‘Villains are misunderstood.’

AceShowbizRami Malek took on Netflix’s hit show “Squid Game” in a new episode of “Saturday Night Live” which aired on October 16. Alongside cast member Pete Davidson, the actor, who served as the host of the episode, could be seen participating in the contest.

In the sketch, the pair kicked things off by singing a country-esque song about the game to Branchez and Big Wet‘s own country spoof, “Turn Up on the Weekend”. They sang about how they were so broke that they decided to sign up for the deadly game.

“There’s a robot girl who caught me running, better duck behind the nearest guy,” Pete sang. In one scene, the comedian had blood splattered in his face as other contestants were brutally shot during a game. “45 million, that’s a whole lot of money/ At least I think it is/ I’m confused by the currency,” Rami then sang.

In the end, Pete won after killing Rami. However, he spent all the money in no time by gambling, prompting him to return to Squid Game.

Meanwhile, in his opening monologue, Rami talked about his “resting villain face.” The “No Time to Die” actor said, “People tell me I have what’s called resting villain face. Villains are misunderstood. Jaws is hungry, Dracula’s thirsty. Frankenstein is horny.” He added, “Darth Vader, he’s just trying to reconnect with his son. And Freddie Krueger — encouraging kids to dream. It’s nice to see Villains finally getting respect. Disney’s even made movies where the villains name is in the title. You’ve got ‘Cruella, ‘Maleficent‘, ‘Bambi‘.”

“I sympathize with them, you know? In “The Lion King“, I’m Team Scar. I actually found Simba to be kind of annoying. You want to be king? You’re like three years old. Relax,” the actor continued to voice love for villains.

Concluding his monologue, Rami expressed his gratitude over his career. “I never thought this would be my life. I’m the son of Egyptian immigrants and I had this kind of sheltered childhood,” he shared. “I grew up in the San Fernando Valley in L.A., but somehow, I had no idea that I lived right next to Hollywood, I truly thought that that was a million miles away, and it’s just a 10-minute drive. Well, it’s three hours with traffic.”

Source: Read Full Article